With this awesome trick you'll be able to know in a flash if they're flat or not. And you'll always have a recharged battery when you need it.


Many appliances require batteries and it can be really annoying when the batteries are flat. Often you need to test each battery separately to figure out which battery is recharged or not.

Many little tricks like this really make life simple. Batteries probably aren't the most important thing in life, but many people have this problem and this solution is sure to help.



He conclude that good batteries don’t bounce because of the anti-bounce theory.

This theory states the gel-like substance in a good battery creates a downward force, keeping it flush with the floor when dropped.

Professor Steingart, along with his colleague Shoham Bhadra, were inspired by this, and similar videos, to put these claims to the test.

The yukseklik of the bounce increases as the batteries discharge, and this has led to the common conclusion that internal changes related to the reduction in charge cause of the higher bounce.



But Professor Steingart was intrigued by this discharging, because it is not linear.

Instead, the yukseklik rapidly increases and then levels off - a discovery Professor Steingart and his team had made previously in their work into the internal changes related to battery discharge.

So they dropped batteries through plexiglass tubes, and used a computer microphone to record them striking a benchtop. The researchers were then able to use the time between bounces to determine the yukseklik of the bounce.

The battery bounce test, popularized in online videos, shows that fully charged batteries bounce very little when dropped, while those that have been used for a while bounce higher. The yukseklik of the bounce increases as the batteries discharge, and that has led to the common conclusion that internal changes related to the reduction in charge are the cause of the higher bounce.

"A year ago a buddy of mine who knows I work on this sent me this video and said did you know this happens?" Steingart said. "I didn't. But I had a bunch of batteries on my desk and I was able to verify it."

Don't throw away those bouncing batteries.

Steingart was intrigued by how the bouncing changed as batteries discharged — it was not a linear increase. Instead, the yukseklik rapidly increased and then leveled off. His research team has been working for some time on internal changes related to battery discharge, and he wondered whether the changing bounces reflected an important change in the batteries.

They devised a quick experiment in which they dropped a common battery through a plexiglass tube and used a computer microphone to record it striking a benchtop. The researchers were then able to use the time between bounces to determine the yukseklik of the bounce.

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